Tag Archives: SLO NightWriters

From Our Members – Anything Short of Murder by Tony Piazza

Anything Short of Murder

Tony Piazza’s “Anything Short of Murder” read by Broadway actor James Romick has been released on Audible, and is also available on Amazon and i-Tunes.

Anything Short of Murder is a mystery written in the style of the pulp detective thrillers of the 1930s. It follows the investigation of a former LAPD cop who sets up shop in Hollywood during its golden era, when movies began to talk and studio heads were kings.

Happy listening!

Advertisements
Tagged , ,

From Our Members – Twenty Seven Million by Brian Neary

Does art predict real life?

This morning the archbishop of St. Paul, Minnesota and a deputy bishop resigned, charged with having “turned a blind eye” to repeated reports of inappropriate behavior by a priest who was later convicted of molesting two boys.Al Jazeera news, 6/15/2015

St. Paul attorney Jeff Anderson refers to Vatican criminals as adhering “…to secrecy and self-governance operating above the law.” Minn Star Tribune 6/15/2015

Award winning author Brian Neary appears to have insider information on Vatican deceits, as his acclaimed thriller “Twenty Seven Million” crosses the line from intriguing fiction to shocking and predictive reality. Amazon reviewers are unanimous in their response; a gripping novel that’s …impossible to put down.

Twenty Seven MIllion

Tagged ,

From Our Wordsmith Newsletter – Tips For The Writer With No Routine

Some writers are neat. Organized. Controlled. Disciplined. They have a set routine, they write at the same dedicated hour of each day, for the same number of hours each day. They have pages-long outlines they work from, neatly organized charts and graphs and index cards that keep track of all their story details.

But that’s not all writers. Some of us are messy. Uncontrolled. Undisciplined. We have no routines. We spend hours searching back for details we forgot to put on a chart or graph. We write whenever and wherever the muse strikes, not at pre-appointed times, for as long as the muse graces us with her presence. An hour, a morning, a day.

Which is better? Which is best? There’s so much advice out there about the value of getting up an hour early to write, or staying up an hour longer, and doing it on a consistent basis. And even more advice on outlining your story and working from that outline to keep you focused and on track.

But is this really a better/worse situation, or simply two different ways of working? For many writers, like Ernest Gaines and Anne Perry, routine frees their creativity. They need the structure, the organization. Their minds work best in a confined atmosphere.

But equally as many writers are stifled by routine, writers like Erin Entrada Kelly. Like me (your intrepid editor), if she tries to stick to a writing schedule, she worries more about the passing minutes than the story. Like me, she writes when compelled to write, when the words are there, no matter what time of day, or where she is. If you’re like us, if No Routine is your routine, here is some advice to help you along:

1. Never stop writing, even if in your head. Write with your brain and imagination when you’re not at the keyboard or with pen and paper. Creative ideas are all around you. Cultivate the skill of people watching; they’re weird, fascinating creatures. If you do that, you’ll never run out of ideas.

2. Be Ready. Make sure you have a notebook and pen with you at all times, for when lightning strikes. How many times did a brilliant idea occur to you that you thought you’d never forget? And then you forgot it before you even got home…

3. Be productive. When you’re not writing, read. One feeds the other.

4. Don’t out-talk your ideas. Routine-less writers tend to over-talk their great ideas, which dilutes the need to write them down. Spend less time talking and more time writing it down to work out the kinks. Make it yours. Don’t let the idea play itself out in talk before you have the chance to sit with in in front of keyboard or notebook.

5. Find your own footing. Everyone has his/her own way, and you need to find what works best for you. Advice is great—until it doesn’t work. Don’t think you “have” to do what other writers do. What works for you is the best way.

Tagged ,

Tolosa Press – Call For Submissions

Would you like to have your story published in local press? Now you can!

Web-banner-Tolosa1-1

Tolosa Press publishes three community newspapers in San Luis Obispo county: The SLO City News, The Coast News and The Bay News. Tolosa Press prints 30,000 copies that are distributed in more than 600 racks/locations in the county, plus your story will be featured online.

SLO NightWriters is proud to have the members’ stories featured in each issue of Tolosa Press.

We are looking for SHORT FICTION STORIES, with the word limit of 600.

Want to write, but need an inspiration? How about one of these prompts to get you started – use them as the first sentence of your story, or incorporate them as you write along.

  • She had waited twenty years to return it.
  • Spare some change, please?
  • He had kept his mother alive in his thoughts. Too alive, perhaps.
  • He looked at his phone, turned pale, then quickly left the room. She watched him, smiling.
  • What do you mean, you lost the lottery ticket?

Happy Writing!

http://www.slonightwriters.org

Tolosa Press Submissions Guidelines

*To be eligible to submit, your NightWriter dues must be current.

All submissions must be the original work of the author. You may submit previously published or submitted material if it was not published locally.

Accepting:

–      Short stories – fiction and creative non-fiction. All themes are accepted, but please keep in mind  that Tolosa Press is a family friendly publication. The publisher prefers pieces that grab the  readers and keep them interested until the end.

Not Accepting:

–      Poetry, Essays, Opinion pieces, Excerpts from novels, “How To” articles.

Submission Guidelines:

–      Send your submission as an attachment, not in the body of the e-mail. Attach as a word  document.

–      Word limit (strict!) – 500 – 600

–      Double space; use readable 12 point font, preferably Times New Roman.

–      Insert a header, which should include: title, your name, word count, genre.

–      Include a two sentence bio and insert at the bottom of your submission, even if you have  submitted before.

Submissions should be sent to: chmelik.andrea@gmail.com, with “Tolosa Call for Submission” in the subject line.

NightWriters reserves the right to edit submissions. Whenever time allows, the author will have the opportunity to approve changes.

If your submission is selected, the NightWriter Photographer may arrange to take your picture to submit with the article. 

Andrea Chmelik

Tolosa Press Submissions Manager

Tagged ,

Spoiler Alert! SLO NightReaders Book Discussion – Bluegrass Baseball: A Year in the Minor League Life

We ended the year with Katya Cengel‘s “Bluegrass Baseball: A Year in the Minor League Life”.

Following four Minor League baseball teams in Kentucky through the 2010 season—the triumphs, struggles, and big league hopes and dreams—the book tells the larger story of baseball in America’s smaller venues, where the game in its purest form is still valued and warmly embraced.

What did you think?

The author has graciously agreed to participate in our discussion, and below is a list of questions for her. Feel free to jump in at any point! Leave your comments below.

1. What were some of the behind the scenes things that surprised you about life in the minors?

2. Did any of the players you followed make it big?

3. How does minor league baseball differ from the majors?

4. What is life like for the families of the players?

5. What inspired you to write about minor league baseball?

Thank you all for participating in our SLO NightReaders Online Book Club! We hope you enjoyed our 2014 selection and wish you lots of great reads in 2015!

 

Tagged , , , ,

SLO NW Critique Groups With Openings

Below you can find a list of critique groups that are currently open to new members. NW critique groups are a wonderful benefit of NW membership. To be eligible to participate, your NightWriters dues must be current. While we cannot be, and are not, responsible for any outcomes from these associations, we hope they lead to great creative magic and magnificent literary works! If you see a group that you would like to join, or visit to observe, please e-mail Andrea Chmelik at chmelik.andrea@gmail.com for contact information.

CritBetrayal

POETRY CRITIQUE GROUP FORMING

Poetry Critique Group Emerging! Any poet can join. Any poet can benefit from input of a group, regardless of experience. Email and together we can set time and place to meet.

Moderator: Irene Chadwick

 

JUST US’ CHILDREN’S BOOK CRITIQUE

Meets in the South County. Critiqued at a fast pace, in a process where members critique each other’s writing electronically, followed by a face-to-face meeting twice a month. Meetings are held 1st and 3rd Saturdays at 10am. Contact moderator for details and directions.

Moderator: Lili Sinclaire

 

NORTH COUNTY GROUP

Meets the 1st and 3rd Tuesdays from 9:00 am-12:00 noon (subject to change). Adult and children’s fiction and nonfiction. No genre or skill level restrictions. Meets in Paso Robles.

Moderator: Lillian Brown

 

PISMO SATURDAY GROUP

New group starts Saturday May 10. All levels and genres, short stories, poetry, novels and memoirs. Work is exchanged one week prior to group meetings. 1500 word limit on submissions. Meets the 2nd and 4th Saturdays from 9:00-11:00 am. Contact moderator for location.

Moderator: Tom Snow

 

HI HOPES

This group was invented to fill a need for a Los Osos/San Luis Obispo group that incorporates writers who generate stories, essays, novels, poetry—you get the picture—writers of any description. Whether or not you wish to publish, we’ll help you with ideas to improve your writing. Led by Sharon Sutliff, we meet on the 2nd and 4th Mondays at 9 AM and usually wrap up in time for lunch. We meet in various locations. Call one of the moderators to arrange a visit, or get more information.

Moderators: Sharon Sutliff and Audrey Yanes

 

WHAT IF? WRITING GROUP II (Wed. Afternoon Group)

For all writers of fiction and creative non-fiction. Meets every Wednesday in Los Osos from 3:00pm to 5:00 pm. Not a traditional NightWriter critique group. Work is produced in each session, then analyzed according to the objective of the day’s goal. Based on writing exercises designed to jump-start the creative process (gleaned from a variety of published authors), these sessions take writers through the process of writing fiction from inception of idea to the final resolution. This group is for all writers who want to learn the process of crafting a well-told story while developing their own voice and style. We explore such topics as ideas, character, story arc, tone, voice, POV, tension, dialogue, resolution, writing mechanics, etc. There is a small monthly fee involved for this class to cover materials.

Moderator: Susan Tuttle

 

WHAT IF? WRITING GROUP III (Monday Evening Group)

This group is on hiatus at this time. If you are interested in an evening class, contact the moderator.

Moderator: Susan Tuttle

 

ADULT NOVELS

Lili Sinclaire is considering FORMING A NEW GROUP for ADULT NOVELS in a process where members critique each other’s writing electronically, followed by a face- to-face meeting.

Moderator: Lili Sinclaire

Tagged ,

SLO NightReaders – December Pick

For December, we selected Katya Cengel‘s “Bluegrass Baseball: A Year in the Minor League Life”. Following four Minor League baseball teams in Kentucky through the 2010 season—the triumphs, struggles, and big league hopes and dreams—the book tells the larger story of baseball in America’s smaller venues, where the game in its purest form is still valued and warmly embraced.

Cengel-Bluegrass-Baseball

 The story begins before the season with national-anthem singing tryouts in Lexington, then tags along with players, staffs, and fans at home, in the office, and on the field, offering a rare glimpse of the unglamorous reality of Minor League ball. From the front-office staff in Bowling Green planning kooky promotions, to a trainer grocery shopping for a team on forty dollars a day, to a new wife coming to terms with her husband’s transitory lifestyle, to a father struggling to make it back to the Majors and a Cuban defector blowing everyone away with a 100-mph-plus fastball these are the people who live to make baseball happen, in all its nitty-gritty glory.

Katya Cengel lives in California Central Coast and was a presenter at the 2013 Central Coast Writers Conference. She has written about everything from retired dancing bears in Bulgaria to the world’s largest machine gun shoot in Kentucky. Her work has appeared in Newsweek, National Geographic and Time.com among other publications. A World Affairs Journalism Fellow in 2005, she received second place in the Society of Professional Journalists Green Eyeshade Award in 2006 for her series “Lost Boys, Torn Families”. Her book “Bluegrass Baseball: A Year in the Minor League Life” (University of Nebraska Press), was one of five finalists for the 2013 Kentucky Literary Award.

Tagged , , , ,

Spoiler Alert! SLO NightReaders Book Discussion – The Pope Goes Speed Dating

The Pope Goes Speed Dating is a contemporary romantic comedy set in Australia that explores how the life of a young woman is turned on its head by an unexpected inheritance of a lifelong endowment and a mansion on Bondi Beach—all she has to do is permanently engage the services of her late grandfather’s English butler.

1. Imagine yourself in Summer Pennington’s shoes – would you consider it a dream come true, or a nightmare?

2. Which one of the romances in the book was your favorite?

3. Did you enjoy the Australian setting? Did the author do a good job of transporting you to “the land down under”?

4. Which character did you like the best and why?

5. If you could ask the author a question, what wold it be?

Thank you for reading and don’t forget to check back tomorrow for our December book announcement!

 

Tagged , , , ,

SLO NightReaders – November Pick

In November we are offering you romance, suspense and humor all in one!

The Pope Goes Speed Dating

The Pope Goes Speed Dating,written by Tom L. Snow, is a contemporary romantic comedy set in Australia that explores how the life of a young woman is turned on its head by an unexpected inheritance of a lifelong endowment and a mansion on Bondi Beach—all she has to do is permanently engage the services of her late grandfather’s English butler.

The novel is a humorous, yet poignant, romp through the triumphs and mishaps of Summer Pennington and her close-knit group of friends whose lives are deeply affected by the arrival of this uniquely talented, witty and principled butler. He too undergoes a metamorphosis from being influenced by the snobbery of England’s upper class to discovering the more casual and parochial charms of Australia.

While the book’s primary theme focuses on the vagaries of love, its plot unfolds amidst more sinister emotions—jealousy, prejudice, violence, revenge and a dark secret that roils within the mind of this mysterious interloper. The backdrop for this ‘rags-to-riches’ tale is the natural splendor of Australia’s landscapes, its unique flora and fauna, the quaint charms and customs of its people and their distinctive language and humor.

After residing in Sydney for twenty-two years, Tom Snow recently moved back to his native U.S. and is now enjoying life on California’s Central Coast with his Australian wife and daughter. He is currently on the board of SLO NightWriters, where he is serving as the contest director of the 25th annual Golden Quill Awards. As well as working on his next novel, Tom volunteers his time teaching bridge and participating in various organizations within the community coaching fledgling authors on publishing, critiquing and developing their creative skills.

Tagged , , , ,

Spoiler Alert! SLO NightReaders Book Discussion – A Murder Amongst Angels

Sexy, platinum blonde movie siren, Gertrude Hurd had it all-fame, men, and riches. But now she was dead. A fallen angel, whose broken body and tarnished halo was lying on a hillside behind her beach front cafe. It’s 1931, and private detective Tom Logan is back, once again immersed in a perplexing mystery, that has him racing against time to track down a merciless killer. As the body count grows, so do the suspects, as his investigation soon has him bucking against corrupt city officials, the mob, and the Hollywood studio system.

1. Which characters did you think committed the crime? Did you guess the culprit before the end?

2.  The story takes place in 1931 in Los Angeles. Did the author do a good job of transporting you into that period?

3. How did the time period influence the characters’ actions and beliefs?

4. Besides the main character, what stood out in the story for you? The descriptions? The secondary characters? The dialogue?

5. If you could ask the author a question, what would it be?

Thank you for reading and don’t forget to check back tomorrow for our November read announcement!

Tagged , , , ,